Gung ho plot

This Guide explores cultural differences in management style as exemplified in Gung Ho, a film starting Michael Keaton and George Wendt. In an increasingly global economy Japanese cars are manufactured in America, American cars in Japan, and parts for both in each.

Gung ho plot

He has been a failure in his business career thus far because he is too lenient on his workers. He is tagged with countless banners and it is screaming particular phrases repetitively.

This shows the dedication and rigorous conformity required in the Japanese work culture and the often extreme methods used to achieve satisfactory work demeanour.

When Michael Keaton meets with the Japanese board of directors, there are several cultural differences he encounters.

Gung ho plot

Keaton takes a more relaxed demeanour, making political incorrect remarks and profanities, to which the Japanese business men do not laugh or even adjust their rigid deportment. Finally at the conclusion of the meeting, Mr. Keaton asks if anyone has any questions and seeing it rude to ask questions, the Japanese business men all remain silent.

As the former foreman for the plant, Mr. Keaton goes to Tokyo to try to convince the Assan Motors Corporation to reopen the plant and produce their automobiles there. The closure of North American plants to outsource for cheaper or better quality automobile production is a common recurrence throughout North American.

Especially during the recent recession, GM went bankrupt and Ford had to close several plants and fire countless employees. During the first day of work, the Japanese executives wish to begin the day with calisthenics, to which the Americans also find comical and refuse to perform.

Keaton goes to meet with the Japan executives, they all give them a business card, a customary action during a Japanese business meeting, to which Mr. Japanese executives eat their lunches with chopsticks and bathe together in the river near the factory which the American works find both absurd and mock as well.

Finally one of the Japanese overseers refuses to allow one of the American employees to take a newspaper into the bathroom to read; which is a norm in American culture. The Japanese introduce job rotation so that every man is capable of performing every job.

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As oppose to the previous American methodology of allowing each employee to specialize in a specific job on the production line, the Japanese demand that each man can perform any job with quality and effectiveness.

In Japanese factories, all employees are able to do so, and this is expected of the American employees Quality is extremely important to the Japanese executives. Oishi Kazihiro explains to Mr. Keaton several times the pride that Japanese works take in the work and the extend there are willing to the go in order to get their work done; staying after hours with no play to complete their work.

Also the incredible amount of shame their experience of their company does poorly. The Japanese refuse to even produce cars of subpar standards and when the CEO arrives, refuses to count any cars with minor imperfections.“Gung ho” is a Chinese term that literally means “working together.” The term was the slogan of Lt.

Colonel Evans F. Carlson’s Marine Raiders during World War II and its meaning was expanded to mean, enthusiastic, cooperative and enterprising, often in an unrestrained, naïve way. Gung Ho! (full title: Gung Ho!:The Story of Carlson's Makin Island Raiders) is a American war film directed by Ray Enright and starring Randolph barnweddingvt.com story is based on the real-life World War II Makin Island raid led by Lieutenant Colonel Evans Carlson's 2nd Marine Raider Battalion.

Gung Ho! prescribes a three phase method to motivate and energize any group or organization to achieve shared success. Phase 1: The Spirit of the Squirrel. This phase transforms work to make it worthwhile to the team members. “Gung ho” is a Chinese term that literally means “working together.” The term was the slogan of Lt.

Colonel Evans F. Carlson’s Marine Raiders during World War II and its meaning was expanded to mean, enthusiastic, cooperative and enterprising, often in an unrestrained, naïve way.

Mar 14,  · "Gung Ho" is advertised as a clash of cultures after the Japanese reopen the automobile factory in a small Pennsylvania town. That sounded promising.

I guess I was hoping for one of those movies made out of loving attention to detail, in which we and the Japanese would both be treated like eccentric laboratory specimens.

What I got was a disappointment, a movie in which the Japanese are 2/5. Gung Ho: U.S Vs Japanese Management Styles Gung Ho is an interesting movie, which utilizes humour to compare the managerial and cultural differences between the Japanese and the Americans.

The theme of the movie is that a Japanese company takes over a failed American auto plant and saves a town from ruin.

Book Summary: “Gung Ho!” by Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles